How To Grind Wheat Without A Grinder?

You may have heard that fresh, whole wheat is very good for you, but you may be wondering about how you can use it. If you purchase a large sack of whole-wheat for use in your kitchen, you’ll need to know how to grind it or come up with other ideas for use to unlock the tremendous amounts of nutrition wheat berries contain.

In this article, we discuss grinding wheat without a grinder. We also present several other ingenious ideas for using whole wheat berries as a valuable addition to your diet. Read on to learn more on how to grind wheat without a grinder.

Use Your Blender To Make Wheat Flour

use your blender to make wheat flour

Most people have a blender sitting on their kitchen counter, and if you have one you can use it to make flour out of your wheat berries. Just measure out a couple of cups of berries, but don’t put it all in the blender at once. Add it in a little bit at a time and work gradually.

As always, think of safety first. Be sure that your blender is set securely on your counter and that the lid is firmly in place. Pour in about a quarter cup of wheat berries, close the lid and run it on high for about twenty seconds.

Open the lid and add another quarter cup and repeat the process. Keep this up until you’ve got all of your wheat berries in the blender and then just keep blending until you’ve reached the consistency of flour you want.

Once you’ve arrived at the fineness or coarseness you desire, be sure to pour your homemade flour through a strainer or a sifter to remove any hulls or little bits of chaff that may have made their way into the blender.

Making Wheat Flour In The Blender

Note that it’s a good idea not to make more flour than you can use immediately. Homemade flour is not processed, so it will tend to spoil quickly because the oils in it will go rancid.

If you’re making flour for a specific recipe, such as waffles, pancakes or some kinds of cake, you can go ahead and mix all of your ingredients in your blender to save yourself a little time and effort.

How Else Can You Use Wheat Berries?

how else can you use wheat berries

In addition to grinding wheat berries up to make flour, there are quite a few things you can do with them in every day cooking. Here are six top tips for using raw wheat berries.

1. Cook Wheat Berries Like Rice

Just like brown rice, you can measure out a cup of dry wheat berries, rinse them and put them in a pot with two cups of clean water and little bit of oil.

Put the lid on the pot, and bring the water to a boil. Stir, and then simmer it on low for about forty-five minutes.

You can use your cooked wheat berries like brown rice, or you can store them in a sealed container in your refrigerator and add them to a wide variety of dishes, such as yogurt or hot cereal. They are also great in casseroles and can be used to replace part of the meat in some dishes.

2. Cook Cracked Wheat Berries

For faster cooking, crack the wheat berries in the blender a little bit before cooking. This will speed up cooking time and give you a more versatile, rice like ingredient to suit your cooking needs.

3. Slow Cook Berries

You can also “slow cook” wheat berries in a thermos. Just boil two cups of water, a cup of wheat berries and a teaspoonful of salt for a couple of minutes and then pour the mixture into a pre-heated glass-lined or stainless steel thermos. Set aside overnight, or for a minimum of eight hours. Enjoy as a hot cereal dish with honey and butter.

4. Grow Wheat Grass

It’s easy to grow wheatgrass to add to your smoothies. To sprout your wheat berries, layer them between two pieces of clean paper towel in a shallow tray. Drench with clean water and cover lightly with plastic.

Set the tray in a warm place with bright, indirect sunlight. Check it daily, and rinse the paper towels and seeds with clean water daily. By the second day, you should see some healthy, growing wheatgrass. Remove the top paper towel and the plastic.

Allow the wheatgrass to grow to the desired height and add bits to smoothies as you desire for a fresh, green taste and a big boost of chlorophyll and vitamin C.

5. Make Sprouted Wheat

This is similar to growing wheatgrass, but you can just use a jar and no paper towels. Put a handful of wheat berries into a jar of fresh, clean water. Allow it to soak for a few minutes and then drain off the excess water and lay the jar on its side in a cool, fairly dark place.

Rinse your sprouting wheat berries daily. Just as with growing wheatgrass, the berries should sprout within a day or two. Use them right away in salads, soups and stir fries.

6. Toasted Wheat

You can make a nice crunchy snack by toasting wheat berries in a pan with a little oil, just as you would when preparing popcorn the old-fashioned way. The kernels won’t pop open, but they will take on a nice toasty, nutty flavor after being shaken over heat in flavorful oil for five minutes.

You can season your snack as you see fit with any type of flavoring ranging from cinnamon to garlic salt. These crunchy bits are great on their own, or they can be used as a topping for desserts or as an element of trail mix.

Proceed With Caution!

If you’re not used to eating wheat (or buckwheat), be sure to add it to your diet gradually. If you decide to try all of these recipes at once, you may find yourself suffering gastric distress.

Nicky Ellis
Nicky has been an editor at Farm & Animals since 2019. Farm animals have been in her life from her earliest memories, and she learned to ride a horse when she was 5. She is a mom of three who spends all her free time with her family and friends, her mare Joy, or just sipping her favorite cup of tea.

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