How To Use Duck Eggs: Duck Eggs Recipes

Duck eggs are larger, thicker shelled and more flavorful than chicken eggs. Their deep yellow/orange yolks take up more space in the shell, so they are also a better source of omega 3 fatty acids, vitamin A and “good” cholesterol. In this article, we discuss the use of duck eggs in cooking and baking. Read on to learn more on how to use duck eggs.

Cooking With Duck Eggs

How big are duck eggs?

The largest duck egg is about 3 1/2 ounces. By comparison, chicken eggs typically weigh a little over 2 ounces.

Do duck eggs look different than chicken eggs?

When you break a duck egg and a chicken egg side-by-side, you’ll immediately notice that you’ve got about twice as much egg in the duck egg. Additionally, the yoke of a duck egg stands high and is deep orange. The white is quite clear. Once cooked, a fried duck egg looks like a very big fried chicken egg.

Tips For Using Duck Eggs

Duck eggs are great for baking, scrambling, boiling, frying and making omelets, French toast or anything else you would make with chicken eggs.

  1. Duck eggs may need to be beaten a bit more vigorously before incorporating them in a recipe.
  2. It helps to let the eggs reach room temperature before you begin beating.
  3. If you want to make meringue, add a little baking soda before you begin beating for stiffer, lighter peaks.

Do You Need Specific Duck Egg Recipes?

Generally speaking, duck eggs can be used just like chicken eggs. The main differences are that duck eggs are more nutritious and contain more protein. They also have a richer flavor. Because duck eggs are larger, generally speaking you can substitute one large duck egg for two small chicken eggs in any recipe.

When frying or scrambling them or making an omelet, frittata or other recipe that is eggy, you may need fewer eggs per person.

If a recipe calls for one chicken egg, you can try simply substituting a single duck egg. If this turns out to be too much, try just using the yolk next time.

In recipes that require an exact amount of egg, you can measure or weigh the liquid amount before adding it to the recipe, but this is quite uncommon. Generally speaking a little bit too much or little bit too little egg doesn’t make a huge difference in any recipe.

The resulting dish will be indistinguishable from those made with chicken eggs, aside from being a bit tastier.

When you fry, scramble or boil duck eggs, you may want to use a slightly lower temperature because they have more protein than chicken eggs. If you cook them too fast and too hot, the whites may tend to get a little bit rubbery.

If you like your fried egg to be completely cooked with no runny yoke, you may find it helpful to add a little bit of water to the pan after your duck egg begins to cook. Cover the pan with a lid to hold the heat in and cook it thoroughly. Remember that you should use low heat for duck eggs.

Chicken Egg Vs Duck Egg: A Comparison

Are Duck Eggs Good For Baking?

Duck eggs are quite tasty, creamy and rich, and they are excellent for baking! They impart a richer flavor to all baked goods, and when making bread, they also impart a beautiful golden color.

In baked dishes that call for whipped egg whites, you’ll find that the whites rise stiffer and higher than chicken eggs and make a lighter, fluffier more flavorful dish.

One caveat, when you beat duck egg whites, it may take a little more effort to get them to froth. Be sure that your duck eggs are at room temperature, and you may wish to add a pinch of baking soda to help the process.

How Do You Know When Boiled Duck Eggs Are Finished?

The best way to boil duck eggs is to put them in a pot of cold water and bring to a boil on high heat. When the water comes to a full, rolling boil, remove it from the burner and set it aside for about twelve minutes.

Remove the eggs from the hot water using a slotted spoon and crack the shells to stop the cooking process. Place them in an empty bowl and pour cold water over them.

Allow them to cool completely and then peel them. You can keep these peeled duck eggs in a bowl cold water in your fridge for several days. Change the water daily to keep them as fresh as possible.

Resource:

  1. Duck Eggs

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